March 10, 2015

Storytelling V - Storytelling with style

Graffiti wall. Urban art vector background. Seamless texture Stories require protagonists and a conflict. However, it is the way in which you tell them that is decisive. Why that’s the case, we will explain here.

Why storytelling works, we already discussed at the beginning of our series. Messages have the greatest impact on humans when they aren’t purely factual but are able to evoke emotions. This will only happen if the story includes characters which the reader or listener can identify with and has an exciting conflict. It’s a famous rule: no conflict – no plot.

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January 27, 2015

Best Practices for PR Storytelling – LEGO

Storytelling best practices

Lego Steine © Niels Åge Skovbo, FOKUS

We would like to add a very recent example that fits to our previous blog post about best practices in PR storytelling: In April, all the important German print media reported on LEGO – cover story in Capital, two-page report in the SZ magazine, a story in Stern, Spiegel etc. All articles praise the economic revival of LEGO to becoming the second largest toy manufacturer worldwide under the aegis of its CEO Jørgen Vig Knudstorp. Just as a reminder: in 2004, the Danish company was close to bankruptcy and 1,000 jobs were lost. After the triumphant turnaround, journalists are commending LEGO’s successful market strategy, which is based on the ageless, positive identification and the fun of playing with the plastic bricks.

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October 20, 2014

Storytelling IV: Best Practices

In our previous blog posts, we pointed out what to look out for when telling a story and why it works. Now, we’ve looked for great examples where companies apply their story throughout their entire communication. During our search, we realised that this is not so easy to find.

It’s so great when you do eventually find an example, where a strong, emotional story is told, but the product remains the focus.

Here, Google tells us a wonderful story. Wonderful, because it has been skilfully created. And there are several reasons for this. First off, let’s take a look at the story and its structure.

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September 17, 2014

Storytelling III: Where Does One Begin?

Storytelling

(c) fotalia.com

Before you can tell a good story, you should understand a few things about yourself and your audience. We’ll explain what:

We have already explained that the story you tell about your company should be both basic and emotional. Here we give you specific advice on what you should watch out for when finding and telling your story.

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September 3, 2014

Storytelling II – Why it Works

storytelling neurologistics

Storytelling: Our brain loves stories (c) Bryant Arnold

In our first blogpost on storytelling we promised we’d give you a reason why storytelling works as a marketing tool. Here it is:

The basic assumption of storytelling is that the unconscious mind controls a substantial part of human behaviour. Hence, also the purchasing behaviour. Or, as Werner T. Fuchs formulates it: The unconscious mind makes the purchasing decision, the conscious mind justifies it.

In his book „Warum das Gehirn Geschichten liebt“, Werner T. Fuchs presents mechanisms of storytelling. In it, he doesn’t only discuss what makes a story a story, but he also offers numerous examples from the world of marketing and innovatively links them with the latest discoveries in brain research.

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August 20, 2014

Storytelling I: What’s the Story?

Nowadays, marketing and communication cannot get around the following topic: storytelling. There’s no need to go through shelves of books on literature. Simply follow our blog and check out the different aspects of storytelling to deepen your understanding on the topic.

Storytelling for business

Storytelling: why stories matter.

Storytelling is profoundly human (c) fotalia

There are two aspects, which make storytelling so compelling for companies. For one, stories are deeply rooted in human culture. Everybody knows stories, everyone tells stories. The most popular stories are told over and over again – throughout generations.  But more importantly for marketeers: stories convey and release emotions – why and how, we’ll explain in one of the next posts.

Storytelling has nothing to do with superstition. It works – we’ll provide the reason for why it works in another chapter – and is becoming increasingly important. So much so that companies, which are placing more emphasis on direct marketing and social media, cannot avoid storytelling any longer. Due to this development, brand and business communication is rapidly changing from monologue to dialogue.

Whoever wishes to tell a story that works and evokes emotions will most likely ask himself the following questions: “What is a story?” and “What is my story?”.

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