September 25, 2017

Personal Branding: Marketing the Individual

Personal Branding: Marketing the individual

about me handwritten on blackboard

Personal branding has never been more relevant. In order to get recognized, you need to catch the eye. That much has always been true – but in the past, it wasn’t always as simple. Gone are the days when journalists took the bulk of decisions on who and what should be in the news, and how it should be reported.

Thanks to digitalization, everyone has the ability to market themselves through various channels. This applies for stars and celebrities as much as for politicians, executives, freelancers and anybody else whose expert knowledge means they have something to say. However, this doesn’t mean that classic media can be neglected. For personal branding, the mix is key – as well as the right strategy, of course.

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January 27, 2015

Best Practices for PR Storytelling – LEGO

Storytelling best practices

Lego Steine © Niels Åge Skovbo, FOKUS

We would like to add a very recent example that fits to our previous blog post about best practices in PR storytelling: In April, all the important German print media reported on LEGO – cover story in Capital, two-page report in the SZ magazine, a story in Stern, Spiegel etc. All articles praise the economic revival of LEGO to becoming the second largest toy manufacturer worldwide under the aegis of its CEO Jørgen Vig Knudstorp. Just as a reminder: in 2004, the Danish company was close to bankruptcy and 1,000 jobs were lost. After the triumphant turnaround, journalists are commending LEGO’s successful market strategy, which is based on the ageless, positive identification and the fun of playing with the plastic bricks.

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May 7, 2012

Why social media shoots for the stars

copyright JörgHeinrich It’s no secret that social media has taken the world by storm. But some parts of the world seem a lot more reluctant than others to embrace this “storm”. Germany is the perfect example. Look for instance at the world of celebrities. In Germany, celebrities and non-celebrities alike, shy away from even having an online presence. Now I firmly believe in the adage, “each man to his own”. But if the rest of the world is doing it, we’ve got to ask ourselves, aren’t we missing something??

So I decided to ask an expert to shed some light on the subject… Richard Le Cocq is the director of Laughing Buddha, the social media management & digital consultancy based in London.

Richard Le Cocq, Laughing Buddha Marketing Ltd. When a celebrity approaches you to manage their online profile, what are their main requirements?

Richard: All celebrities are individuals, so they come to us with different needs and experiences of social media. Some are savvy and need tips and simple ways to improve their presence, others have no idea where to begin and need setting up and advice so they can feel confident using it. It can be a scary thing for many, what with all the networks you can sign up to and the incredibly public mistakes other public figures have made in the past. So we always try and recognize an individual’s needs first and work closely with our client so they can develop an online voice that suits them. For example, some love chatting about themselves so Twitter makes perfect sense, yet others may be more visual so a photographic platform like Instagram or Flickr might be more appropriate.

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